Monday, 21 April 2014

Epic Pen Spinning

Pen spinning is a form of object manipulation that involves the deft manipulation of a writing instrument with one's hands. Although it is often considered a form of self-entertainment (usually in a school/office setting), multinational competitions and meetings are sometimes held. See this epic spinning from pen spinners: Ian Jenson and PPM.



YouTube link

British Pathé Releases 85,000 Films On YouTube


Newsreel archive British Pathé has uploaded its entire collection of 85,000 historic films, in high resolution, to its YouTube channel. This unprecedented release of vintage news reports and cinemagazines is part of a drive to make the archive more accessible to viewers all over the world.

You can view and share films from this invaluable resource at British Pathé's YouTube channel.

Brushed Off: 12 Dried Out And Abandoned Car Washes

image credit: martin gonzalez

Hold the hot wax and spare the soap, these abandoned car washes have blow-dried their last vehicle and will no longer thank you for coming again.

Cherry Blossom Time-lapse At Brooklyn Botanic Garden

This time-lapse was created by Dave Allen from over 3,000 digital photos, one taken every 3 minutes from April 18 to April 26, 2008, of Brooklyn Botanic Garden's famed Cherry Walk. The music is by Jon Solo, a Brooklyn-based musician and producer.



YouTube link

(thanks Cora)

Daily Cartoon

Dan Rosandich is an American cartoonist. Dan's cartoons have appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, National Review, The National Enquirer, Science Digest, Reader's Digest and Woman's World. The Presurfer, in cooperation with Dan Rosandich, will bring you a cartoon every day.

16 Delicious Facts About Peeps

image credit: John Silverio

You know whether you prefer chicks to bunnies, fresh to stale, or plain to chocolate-covered. But there's a lot you may not know about Peeps, everyone's favorite (non-chocolate) Easter candy.

(via Everlasting Blort)

Sunday, 20 April 2014

Gladys' 1st Gorilla Egg Hunt - Cincinnati Zoo

Last Thursday, the Cincinnati Zoo held their annual gorilla egg hunt. It was baby gorilla Gladys' first Easter egg hunt.



YouTube link

(thanks Cora)

The Wonderful Barn: Ireland's Spiralling Storehouse

image credit: Joe Houghton

The Irish are often the first to admit they have an inclination to exaggerate. So, when a corkscrew-shaped barn was built on an estate in County Kildare near the town of Leixlip in 1743 the locals quickly called this extraordinary structure The Wonderful Barn. Yet in this instance their hyperbole was not unwarranted. This is indeed the most remarkable of barns.

Simon Memory Game


You've probably played this before, the Simon Memory Game. Simon was launched in 1978 and was a better version of the Atari arcade game Touch Me from 1974.

(thanks Chava)

The Weirdest Driving Laws From Around The World

From parking your elephant to tying your dog to the roof - here are some weird and wonderful driving laws from around the world.



YouTube link

(thanks Cora)

Daily Cartoon

Dan Rosandich is an American cartoonist. Dan's cartoons have appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, National Review, The National Enquirer, Science Digest, Reader's Digest and Woman's World. The Presurfer, in cooperation with Dan Rosandich, will bring you a cartoon every day.

40 Rare And Important Archaeological Finds Of All time

image credit

The past can be both shocking and familiar. It's common to say that human nature never changes - but it's still possible for archaeology to surprise us, by pulling things from the ground which transform our conception of the past.

(via madamjujujive)

Saturday, 19 April 2014

The Pitch Drop Experiment - The Ninth Drop

The Pitch Drop experiment is a long-term experiment which measures the flow of a piece of pitch over many years. The experiment was started in 1927 by Professor Thomas Parnell of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, to demonstrate to students that some substances that appear to be solid are in fact very-high-viscosity fluids.

Large droplets form and fall over the period of about a decade. The eighth drop fell on 28 November 2000. And now, after more than 13 years, the ninth drop has collided with the eight in the bottom of the beaker.



YouTube link

Dalek Made From An Egg - Eggsterminate!

image credit: Nancy Sims

How cool is this? A Dalek made out of an egg - looks like a brilliant homemade present for a friend or a member of the family who just cant get enough of the Science Fiction TV show Doctor Who.
But just how do you make one?

Learning To Love Death: New Museum Takes A Walk On The Shadow Side

image credit: Morbid Anatomy

Morbid Anatomy - a blog, library, curiosity gallery, and lecture series dedicated to the places where death and beauty intersect - often revels in the macabre, albeit in a thoughtful, intellectual way. Thanks to its swelling popularity, Morbid Anatomy is expanding into a three-story, 4,200-square-foot museum in Brooklyn this spring.

Collectors Weekly talked to founder Joanna Ebenstein about her strange fascinations with Santa Muetre, the holy saint of death; medical specimens; depictions of deformity and disease; superstition and paranormal research.

(thanks Lisa)

Easter Eggs: Hidden Gems Of The Internet


It's almost Easter and that means eggs. Easter eggs are decorated eggs that are hidden in various places for children to find. But an Easter egg can also be an intentional inside joke like a hidden message, or feature in a work such as a computer program, movie, book, or crossword.

Here's an infographic that shows some of the Easter eggs on the Internet.

(thanks Ashleigh)

Daily Cartoon

Dan Rosandich is an American cartoonist. Dan's cartoons have appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, National Review, The National Enquirer, Science Digest, Reader's Digest and Woman's World. The Presurfer, in cooperation with Dan Rosandich, will bring you a cartoon every day.

The Lost Empire That Ruled The Silk Road

image credit

Today, the city of Samarkand in Uzbekistan is relatively remote, known mostly for its magnificent medieval ruins. But over a millennium ago, it was one of the richest cities on the infamous trade route known as the Silk Road. Back in the 600s CE, that route was called simply 'the road to Samarkand.'

Samarkand's culture was a hybrid of Iranian and Chinese influences, its religion a mix of Zoroastrianism and other traditions, and it belonged to a now-vanished ethnic group called the Sogdians.